Exercise to reduce risk of chronic disease

The World Health Organization just updated their recommendations related to exercise.

In adults, physical activity confers benefits for the following health outcomes: improved
all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, incident hypertension, incident sitespecific cancers, incident type-2 diabetes, mental health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression); cognitive health, and sleep; measures of adiposity may also improve.
Source

For those 65+, regular physical activity is recommended. “As part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls.”

The guidelines stress that some activity is better than none – start small with something that you’re comfortable with and build on that…over time you can increase the frequency, intensity and duration of your workouts.

***This isn’t medical advice, always check with your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program and consider working with a trainer to make sure you’re using proper form***

Exercise training improves memory

Tons of evidence-based research is available online touting the benefits of working out…and while reducing weight/body fat and increasing energy may come to mind at first, cognitive benefits have just as much positive impact on quality of life and healthy aging.

In this Harvard Health article, read how the benefits of exercise – from reduced insulin resistance and inflammation to improved mood and sleep have a positive impact on cognition as well. Other “findings indicate that aerobic exercise training is effective at reversing hippocampal volume loss in late adulthood, which is accompanied by improved memory function.”

A quick workout

Here’s my quick ~25 minute workout -download the Tabata Pro timer app, set at 1 minute of work, 20 seconds of rest for 3rounds:

  • Push ups
  • Squat to alternating side leg raise
  • Overhead dumbbell crunch to triceps extension
  • Alternating step back lunge with kickthru
  • Chest fly
  • Burpee
  • Reverse fly
  • Wide leg squat to front row

(Ask your doc of exercising is right for you & stop /seek medical attention immediately if you feel at all unwell, dizzy, etc)

Increased activity later in life can reduce mortality rates

https://www.popsci.com/older-adults-start-exercising

It’s never too late to get started & reap the benefits of exercise!

From this article: “Those who upped their activity in their 30s, 40s, and 50s had mortality rates 32 to 35 percent lower than the control group – just as much as those who exercised from adolescence straight through their 60s. That was true even after researchers factored in whether people smoked, their educational level, race, alcohol consumption, diet, and several other confounders that would influence mortality and could correlate with physical activity level”.

Balance

No, not work/home life balance, muscle balance/imbalance…

Per the NASM blog, “efficient human movement and function requires a balance of muscle length and muscle strength around a joint”.

Causes of muscle imbalances can include stress, bad posture (especially with technology – mouse, keyboard, phone), chronic sitting, repetitive movement patterns or prior injury.

Consequences of muscle imbalances can include increased risk for falls, injury, and muscle strain.

When you work with a trainer, pre-existing muscle imbalances can be identified and corrected which may  allow for reduced risk of falling, reduced risk of injury, improved efficiency and results from a personalized exercise program.

Goal:Fit Method training starts with a thorough assessment and is followed by a personalized, tailored plan of corrective exercise targeting increased flexibility, balance, strength and endurance to maximize quality of life.