Why Strength Train?

Recent research has shown the benefits of strength training to include reduced risk of stroke, heart attack and diabetes. Specific to older adults, resistance training can reduce sarcopenia (age related muscle loss) and fall risk as well as help to maintain bone mass.

This article cites research concluding that “resistance exercise promoted better anti-inflammatory balance and physical performance simultaneously with an increase in cognitive profile in older women with cognitive impairment”.

Aim for 3-4 strength training sessions per week and choose exercises and weights that provide a challenge. If you’re just starting out, check with your doctor & consider body weight exercises, light dumbbells or resistance exercises or even household items.

A session or two with a trainer is a great idea to ensure you’re choosing the right weights & that your form is on point.

Get up off the floor

Can you go from standing to sitting to standing without wobbling or using your hands or knees?

Some research has shown a relationship between this movement and longevity. While not a direct correlation, it’s a good general test of functional strength and balance.

Try it & let me know if you can make it hands-free!

Harder than you’d like? I can help! My online program is almost ready. Follow along for updates!

A quick workout

Here’s my quick ~25 minute workout -download the Tabata Pro timer app, set at 1 minute of work, 20 seconds of rest for 3rounds:

  • Push ups
  • Squat to alternating side leg raise
  • Overhead dumbbell crunch to triceps extension
  • Alternating step back lunge with kickthru
  • Chest fly
  • Burpee
  • Reverse fly
  • Wide leg squat to front row

(Ask your doc of exercising is right for you & stop /seek medical attention immediately if you feel at all unwell, dizzy, etc)

Increased activity later in life can reduce mortality rates

https://www.popsci.com/older-adults-start-exercising

It’s never too late to get started & reap the benefits of exercise!

From this article: “Those who upped their activity in their 30s, 40s, and 50s had mortality rates 32 to 35 percent lower than the control group – just as much as those who exercised from adolescence straight through their 60s. That was true even after researchers factored in whether people smoked, their educational level, race, alcohol consumption, diet, and several other confounders that would influence mortality and could correlate with physical activity level”.