Movement strategies for healthy aging

It is so important to stay healthy and active as we age. In addition to consuming healthy whole food plant based nutrition, there’s no doubt or shortage of research on the benefits of movement and exercise to encourage strong bones & muscles, improve cardiovascular health and even cognitive function. Exercise can also reduce the risk of falls and injuries as we get older. But even if you’re not in perfect shape, you need to just START (after consulting your healthcare provider, of course and under the supervision of a certified trainer to be sure you have great form and are doing appropriate exercises). You’ll be surprised how quickly you can adapt to a new healthier lifestyle once you figure out what type of activities work best for you!

It’s never too late to start; however, there is an advantage to starting early to encourage healthy aging. What you do now determines how you’ll live a decade from now.

exercises for healthy aging

  • Low impact activities (Swimming, yoga, Pilates, walking, recumbent bike)
  • Group activities that incorporate the social aspect may increase your likelihood to participate & not skip. A few possibilities: pickle ball, tennis, golf, walking group – just make sure you don’t allow yourself to feel pressured to push harder than you should.
  • Resistance training: It’s so important to stay STRONG and avoid sarcopenia (age-related muscle loss)
  • Look for opportunities to increase general activity: studies have shown that staying more active throughout the day, providing our bodies the opportunity to increase the heart rate which improves cardiovascular health. Consider taking the stairs or the longer route to the bathroom at work, parking far away at the grocery, walking to chat with someone instead of sending an email.
  • Brain/body training: Activities that require some level of balance, agility, hand-eye coordination are great as well – again ask your healthcare provider for suggestions that are appropriate to your current ability & progress from there.

Inactivity and mortality risk

When looking at risk for cardiovascular disease as well as all-cause mortality, inactivity is a greater risk for both than any other single habit or practice. 

The evidence is clear: “when inactive individuals are compared with active individuals, the inactive individuals increase their risk of cardiovascular disease by between 150% and 240%, and  individuals who choose to be inactive accept the same increased risk of heart disease as individuals who smoke a pack of cigarettes a day! Unfortunately, 15% of the adult population in the United States still smoke a pack of cigarettes a day, and 60% to 80% are either not adequately active or completely inactive. Thus, inactivity carries the same risk as cigarette smoking a pack of cigarettes per day and is between 4 and 5 times more prevalent!   source

So how much exercise do you need? 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise per week, plus 2 days/week of strength training exercise is the general recommendation released by the CDC recently. Always check with your healthcare provider for specific recommendations tailored to your individual needs, and check out the CDC’s general guidelines here.

Super 60! Finish Summer STRONG!

Ready to finish Summer 2021 with a BANG & get in great shape?!

Join our Goal Fit gang in the SUPER 60! Program! You can go all-in on all the strategies or go for an 80/20 or 90/10 approach. I have 2 vacations planned, so I am going to commit to 90/10!

Anyone can join in for FREE, but Goal Fit monthly members have added benefits:

  • Increased accountability
  • Fun, supportive community
  • New workout videos every week
  • New breathwork or meditation videos each week
  • New recipes every week
  • Live & recorded weekly check-ins via zoom (2 options/week)
  • Individual zoom chat re your goals and any modifications
  • Prizes!

*Click HERE to join the membership for just $10.99/month & cancel at any time.

Why you NEED to exercise in midlife!

Many women experience a “menopause middle” increase in belly fat in their 40s and 50s, and it can be super frustrating!

Weight gain and increased abdominal obesity are both risk factors for coronary artery disease – and both common with menopausal women. Recent studies regarding the benefits of regular physical activity in midlife women are “consistently suggestive of a positive impact on mood and weight control.” source

“During midlife years, women are at risk of increasing body weight and waist circumference. We evaluated changes in weight and waist circumference from enrollment to 2 years later and examined the influence of physical activity level on those changes among 232 women aged between 40-50. Weight increased significantly for the entire sample. Those who increased their physical activity from enrollment to 2 years later had the smallest increase in weight and had a slight decrease in waist circumference. To maintain ideal weight and waist circumference, midlife women should be encouraged to increase physical activity before and during the menopausal transition.” -source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563258/

As our hormones change, cortisol levels in the body can increase as well, resulting in that dreaded ‘menopause middle’. Working to reduce stress (which also happens to be a side benefit of exercise) via mindfulness and meditation as well as improving sleep can have a major positive impact as well. source

The best time to make a change is before you notice any symptoms – the second best time is RIGHT NOW! Click here to join us in the Goal Fit Monthly Membership for only $10.99

Exercise to reduce risk of chronic disease

The World Health Organization just updated their recommendations related to exercise.

In adults, physical activity confers benefits for the following health outcomes: improved
all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, incident hypertension, incident sitespecific cancers, incident type-2 diabetes, mental health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression); cognitive health, and sleep; measures of adiposity may also improve.
Source

For those 65+, regular physical activity is recommended. “As part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls.”

The guidelines stress that some activity is better than none – start small with something that you’re comfortable with and build on that…over time you can increase the frequency, intensity and duration of your workouts.

***This isn’t medical advice, always check with your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program and consider working with a trainer to make sure you’re using proper form***