Get toned at 50+

“On average, people lose about 30 percent of their muscle power between ages 50 and 70. But this doesn’t have to be; inactivity and too little protein hasten the process. Keep muscles healthy with regular strength training — a smart step that 79 percent of people in their 50s skip.” source

That muscle loss leads to decreased metabolism, and often times we take in more calories than we realize.  While it’s not good to be a slave to My Fitness Pal, it can be eye-opening to track every bite & sip you take in for a few days to get a true picture of your calories & macros.

It’s also important to vary your exercise, making sure to include strength/resistance training with weights to build muscle!!  

*as always, ask your doc before starting or changing your exercise routine or diet*

Movement strategies for healthy aging

It is so important to stay healthy and active as we age. In addition to consuming healthy whole food plant based nutrition, there’s no doubt or shortage of research on the benefits of movement and exercise to encourage strong bones & muscles, improve cardiovascular health and even cognitive function. Exercise can also reduce the risk of falls and injuries as we get older. But even if you’re not in perfect shape, you need to just START (after consulting your healthcare provider, of course and under the supervision of a certified trainer to be sure you have great form and are doing appropriate exercises). You’ll be surprised how quickly you can adapt to a new healthier lifestyle once you figure out what type of activities work best for you!

It’s never too late to start; however, there is an advantage to starting early to encourage healthy aging. What you do now determines how you’ll live a decade from now.

exercises for healthy aging

  • Low impact activities (Swimming, yoga, Pilates, walking, recumbent bike)
  • Group activities that incorporate the social aspect may increase your likelihood to participate & not skip. A few possibilities: pickle ball, tennis, golf, walking group – just make sure you don’t allow yourself to feel pressured to push harder than you should.
  • Resistance training: It’s so important to stay STRONG and avoid sarcopenia (age-related muscle loss)
  • Look for opportunities to increase general activity: studies have shown that staying more active throughout the day, providing our bodies the opportunity to increase the heart rate which improves cardiovascular health. Consider taking the stairs or the longer route to the bathroom at work, parking far away at the grocery, walking to chat with someone instead of sending an email.
  • Brain/body training: Activities that require some level of balance, agility, hand-eye coordination are great as well – again ask your healthcare provider for suggestions that are appropriate to your current ability & progress from there.

Watch our for Hormone Disruptors!

Although fertility is off the table at this point in my life, hormone health is at front of mind these days as it relates to menopause & reducing my risk of hormone related cancers, as well as for my daughter who is of child-bearing age.  

I’ve been on the low-tox train for awhile, but just recently swapped out my personal care products to Hugh and Grace.  While there are plenty of ‘clean’-labelled lines on the market these days, H&G takes clean to a whole new level by being hormone safe as the first skin care line that directly addresses hormone disruption. 

I love that everything is beautifully packaged and looks & feels like a fancy brand, not too dirty-hippie-ish.  Check out the FAQ below & let me know if you’re interested in trying any of the products – I can drop off samples if you’re local to me or pop some in the mail!  If you fall in love like I have, I can hook you up with a major discount as well!

Check out the line HERE

Exercise to reduce risk of chronic disease

The World Health Organization just updated their recommendations related to exercise.

In adults, physical activity confers benefits for the following health outcomes: improved
all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, incident hypertension, incident sitespecific cancers, incident type-2 diabetes, mental health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression); cognitive health, and sleep; measures of adiposity may also improve.
Source

For those 65+, regular physical activity is recommended. “As part of their weekly physical activity, older adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasizes functional balance and strength training at moderate or greater intensity, on 3 or more days a week to enhance functional capacity and to prevent falls.”

The guidelines stress that some activity is better than none – start small with something that you’re comfortable with and build on that…over time you can increase the frequency, intensity and duration of your workouts.

***This isn’t medical advice, always check with your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program and consider working with a trainer to make sure you’re using proper form***

Why Keep a Journal?

Do you journal? This is one that I resisted for a long time. Once I started seeing benefits for myself, I started implementing it with some of my patients to rave reviews. If you’re a skeptic like I was, worry that the effort isn’t worth the time, or just need a little nudge to get started, here are some of the myriad benefits:

  • Stress relief : See here and here
  • Improved memory: Journaling can boost memory and comprehension, as well as working  memory capacity, which may reflect improved cognitive processing. Source
  • Clarifies goals and courses of action to achieve them: “Journaling about your goals helps you clarify what you want and encourages you to consider the why and how, not just the what.” Source
  • Promotes creativity
  • Encourages a sense of gratitude
  • And many more!

Here’s a quick journaling exercise as a place to start. I strongly recommend pen & paper over a computer, tablet or smartphone.